Yale Scientists Explain Why Computers Crash But We Don’t

The hierarchical organization of the transcriptional regulatory network of bacterium E. Coli, left, shows a pyramidal structure compared to the Linux call graph, which has many more routines controlling few generic functions at the bottom.
The hierarchical organization of the transcriptional regulatory network of bacterium E. Coli, left, shows a pyramidal structure compared to the Linux call graph, which has many more routines controlling few generic functions at the bottom.

Yale scientists recently revealed why living organism malfunction less than computers, after doing a study on it. The Yale team compared the evolution of organisms and computer operating system. They analyzed the control networks in both Linux operating system as well as bacterium Escherichia coli.

They found out that both E coli and the Linux networks are arranged in hierarchies, but with some notable differences in how they achieve operational efficiencies. There was differences in the molecular network arrangement. When its arranged in a pyramid in bacteria, its inverted pyramid in Linux operating system. There were only limited number of master regulatory genes at the top that control a broad base of specialized functions, which act independently in bacteria. But taking the case of Linux operating system, there were many different top-level routines controlling few generic functions at the bottom of the network. According to Gerstein, this is because software engineers tend to save money and time by building upon existing routines rather than starting systems from scratch. He also added that operating system is more vulnerable to breakdowns because even simple updates to a generic routing can be very disruptive. To compensate this, generic routines need to be fine-tuned periodically by designers.

Published by

Sreejith

A strong believer of: 1. Knowledge is power 2. Progress comes from proper application of knowledge 3. Reverent attains wisdom 4. For one's own salvation, and for the welfare of the world

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s